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SIIM 2011 Annual Meeting, Call for Abstract…

With the ongoing advances in medical imaging and healthcare IT fields, The Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) is playing a major role in highlighting the latest in diagnostic imaging IT. SIIM is going to hold its next annual meeting in June 2011. The meeting will take place at Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center, Washington, DC.   SIIM Call for Abstracts: SIIM has recently started calling for abstracts for its next meeting. The due date for submitting them will be the 10th of September 2010. Authors are going to be informed about acceptance on the 1st of November 2010. The Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine is encouraging authors to submit abstracts that discuss actual trials more than those describing future plans or general reviews of subjects. Moreover, SIIM listed a number of topics and the submitted abstracts are to be indexed under one of them. The topics include: Advanced Visualization, Automated Reporting, Business Analytics, Dashboards, and Knowledge Warehouses, Clinical Workflow, Data Management, Enterprise Imaging and other Specialties, Image Processing and Analysis, Interoperability and Integration, Meaningful Use of EHR Technology, Practical Imaging Informatics, Radiation Dose and Image Acquisition, Reading Room, in addition to Vocabularies, Ontologies, Natural Language Processing, and Miscellaneous section that includes topics not included in the previous categories.SIIM mentioned that abstracts are to be submitted in English only. There are two formats for the abstracts; authors should choose one of them, first is Hypothesis-driven abstracts; which include hypothesis, introduction, methods, results, discussion, conclusion, and keywords. The other format is Descriptive Abstracts, including background, evaluation, discussion, conclusion, and keywords. In both formats, abstracts are to be within 800 and 1,200 words in length.For submitting abstracts for the next SIIM annual meeting, please visit this link, ... Read more

HIMSS Virtual Conference & Exhibition, who should …

With the huge advances in internet that made the whole world seems like a small village, a wide range of organizations are taking advantages of the internet to be able to provide maximum benefits to their members. HIMSS Virtual Conference & ... Read more

A Special Report from SIIM 2010
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At SIIM 2010, Herman Oosterwijk discussed issues that deal specifically with PACS connectivity. He outlined the following  problems: Network Issues: A well defined and managed network infrastructure is essential. Proper IP addressing and port number assignment has to be done. Duplicate IP addresses can create issues and are not always easy to troubleshoot. In case this is suspected, a “netscan” utility will show all IP addresses and potential duplicates. Note that DICOM devices rely on fixed IP addresses, as almost none of the PACS vendors make use of the dynamic configuration capabilities defined by the DICOM standard. Dynamic IP addressing is fine as long as the router does not re-assign them to a different address, e.g. when being re-booted or replaced. Note also that DICOM has an “official” assigned port number, i.e. port 11112, which is more reliable than the often used “well-known” port 104. Not necessarily falling under the network but related is the need to manage AE titles making sure they are also unique. Realize that some devices have multiple AE’s with potential different AE titles. Incorrect net mask definitions and/or VLAN specifications might make certain destinations unreachable. A rather frequent occurrence is the incorrect setting of the switch, e.g. to half duplex or mismatching the device setting, especially when auto-negotiating is configured. Switch issues result in major performance issues and can only be made visible when using a network sniffer. DICOM Header Issues: The DICOM image header is generated through mapping RIS data, generation of the modality and manual input by a user. Either one of these sources can potentially generate incorrect and/or invalid data in the image header. Problems are unfortunately not always detected. For example, an incorrectly identified study might be archived in the PACS and get “lost”, only appearing when the data is migrated, which could be years later. Some PACS systems are more conservative than others and check every attribute, while other are more liberal and don’t necessarily complain. A header with an Institution ID exceeding the maximum length of that field might be stored by vendor A while being rejected as an invalid image when being migrated years later. In this particular instance, the Institution ID could have been mapped from the RIS using a worklist, while not checking for any length violations (note that the source of the data, i.e. the HL7 data elements might not have the same restrictions). Missing and/or incorrect patient demographics can be caused by the RIS being down, or a technologist not using the worklist. This will cause a study to be unverified or “broken” at the PACS. Some PACS applications sort and display images according to image and/or series number instead of according to slice orientation and body part causing the images to be displayed in the incorrect order. When retrieving comparison exams, one can run across some of the older date and time formats in the header, which might cause issues as well. Hanging Protocol Issues: Hanging protocols not working is almost always related to incorrect header information or the wrong interpretation of the headers. A common mismatch is related to the way CR and DR systems organize their images into series. Some create a new series for each view (e.g. a Chest PA and LAT), some group them together in a single series. If the viewing software can only be configured to show different series next to each other, there will be some really unsatisfied radiologists. Another frequent issue occurs when some modalities modify automatically series and study descriptions, not taking the values from the worklist and therefore causing these descriptions not matching the hanging protocol configurations at the view station. CD import issues: These issues almost always can be traced back to non-compliance with the DICOM standard and/or corresponding IHE profile. Frequent issues are the absence of DICOM image files because the vendor is only providing their proprietary format, a missing directory file, mismatch of the so-called meta-file header with the actual data content, incorrect transfer syntaxes such as compression, and several others. A recent issue has also been splitting up studies over multiple CD’s. In many cases, one can convert the images to an acceptable format that can be imported; however, in some cases it is impossible to read the proprietary information, causing a repeat exam. One also need to make sure that patient identifiers are replaced, including the Accession Number otherwise the integrity of the PACS database could be compromised. SOP Class support: Modalities are eager to support new SOP Classes as they contain more information and allow for better viewing and processing. PACS systems traditionally lag with their support for this new functionality. The most common mismatches are due to non-support of the PACS for the enhanced CT and MRI SOP Classes, Structured reports, such as generated by CAD devices and Ultrasound units for measurements, and for new specialties such as ophthalmology, dentistry and endoscopy. In most cases, a modality can be “defeatured” to fall back to an older SOP Class, or alternate encoding (e.g. burn in the CAD marks into a secondary capture), in some cases, one will be stuck with the proprietary information (e.g. MRI spectroscopy). Transfer syntax support: In addition to missing SOP Class support, PACS systems might not support the specific encoding, i.e. transfer syntaxes. Occasionally, a PACS system might mishandle a Big Endian encoding from an older modality, JPEG or wavelet compression support. Many PACS systems do not (yet) support the MPEG files created by endoscopy and surgery exams. UID issues: Even although this is a “header issues, it is mentioned on its own because of the frequency and severity of its impact. Some devices create “illegal” UID’s because their algorithm creates sometimes empty values or subcomponents with leading zero’s. Most PACS systems will either refuse these images or quarantine them. Some modalities issue a new UID when an image is resent, which requires someone to delete these duplicates at the PACS. Some modalities re-use a UID therefore requiring a PACS SA to fix those as well. Modality Worklist issues: A worklist should match the studies to be performed at a modality, no more and no less. A “broad” worklist is generated by matching modality (e.g. CT, MR), location (e.g. station name or scheduled AE title), and other parameters such as the scheduled date/time range. Some Modality worklist providers provide too much data (e.g. all of CR exams instead of only the ones for the ER), some provide not enough differentiation (e.g. only the bone-scans) and some provide not enough. Filtering at both the MWL provider and modality is often required. Note that single value matching using e.g. the Patient ID or Accession Number with a barcode scanner, card reader or other scanner works much better. Remedies are reconfiguring the modality worklist provider, interface engine, or sometimes changing the input data by the scheduling department. Burned-in Data: Many Ultrasound units and any frame-grabber interface have the unfortunate side-effect that all of the information on the screen is captured, including the patient demographics. This can create major issues when the patient demographics is incorrect, which happens in most cases because a technologist forgets to select a new patient or makes an incorrect selection. The only remedy is to replace these pixels with a “paint-brush” application, which however is very rarely supported by most PACS vendors. Many users put “X-es” over the incorrect text, with as serious risk that a receiving application might not support these overlays, presentation states, or, even proprietary annotations. There are open source utilities available that can take care of these pixel replacements. Loss of annotations: Many PACS systems still support proprietary solutions to store annotations. When displayed on the PACS workstations from the same vendor, they appear, however, when displayed on another vendor’s workstation, such as used by a referring physician, night hawk service, or 3rd party web servers, they will disappear. The only solution is to generate compatible overlays (some modalities and workstations have this option) and/or upgrade all of your devices to support the DICOM Softcopy Presentation ... Read more

SIIM 2010, products highlights
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Realizing the significant importance of SIIM 2010 annual meeting, a wide range of companies competed to showcase their products in the event. The SIIM 2010 was carried out under a key topic, which was "Value innovation through imaging ... Read more

Most Common Issues as Reported at SIIM 2010…

Skip Kennedy, Kaiser Permanente talked about the top PACS problems. An important issue is what to do if the system goes down. One of the things people focus on is to get a better reliable system, in other words, how to get more "9’s in your uptime (99,999%?). However, each "9" relates to a substantial amount of investment and money. It might be better and more cost effective to come up with alternate workflows, a good test system, work- around, because a system will go down one time or another. Performance is an issue as well; as Skip mentioned, most people never had a call about the system being too fast, but many people are complaining about it being too slow. A stopwatch is a tool that every pacs administrator needs, but should be the last resort as real-time data about performance is a must and often not readily available. Real time performance dashboards are a must, however require significant IT investment. These type of investments can be made by major institutions, however, open source tools, and built-in tools are needed. A major issue is the disparity of the systems and data, e.g. if one wants to know the steps involved with a simple exam, one might need to do data mining of the HIS, to find out when it was ordered, the RIS, when it was scheduled and completed, the modality, when it started, the PACS when it was read and the voice recognition system when it was signed off, reported and faxed or securely emailed to the physician. This leaves open the time that it was actually be read by that physician. David Clunie from Radpharm also gave some examples in case the PACS system does not perform as you might expect. One of the examples that he gave was with regard to the display of annotations. For example, a drawing on the image at thon modality or workstation might not be visible in the  CD viewer, in the web viewer, or another PACS or EMR. This is despite the fact that everyone is DICOM and/or IHE compliant. Overlays can be sent a) in the pixel data, i.e. "burned in", b) in the image header, or c) as a Presentation State, all of these solutions being totally DICOM "legal" but if one system uses method a) and the receiver uses method b), there is no true interoperability. To diagnose this problem, one could send the images with known annotations to simulator, run validation tools, send test images to the receiver system using the sets of test images used by IHE and tweak and/or modify sending ... Read more

SIIM 2010 Starts With a Great Kick-Off…

Dr. Bradley Erickson from the Mayo clinic,  Chair of SIIM, kicked off the annual meeting  in Minneapolis, with a slogan "Value innovation through imaging informatics", i.e. how to get additional information from images, such as "buried" inside the image pixels and/or metadata. He also added “Buying CT, MR is like dating, buying a PACS/RIS is like getting Married” and therefore, to know exactly what your requirements are and making sure a vendor meets your needs is critical.  As a matter of fact, divorcing a vendor is even more painful than just replacing a modality. Therefore, the emphasis of SIIM has changed recently from covering RIS –PACS to include 3-D, CAD, but most importantly business analytics, i.e., how to run business well. These topics are important to understand to makes sure that one can select the proper partners. Dr. Raymond  Geis discussed politics and business intelligence. Against the political background of the cost of healthcare in the US being unsustainable (quote from Obama), increasing  national and global competition for radiology contracts, the  FDA being more pro-active in reviewing imaging and PACS systems, there is a major investment going to be made. The ARRA will invest $27B in healthcare IT to reform healthcare. Money is already being spent right now as 52% of the US hospitals increased HIT budgets. Now, there is still a lot of confusion about the so-called "meaningful use" criteria that systems have to meet to be candidate for any ARRA money, and also, the implementations are still less than 10%, for example, CPOE with decision support is only implemented in 7.4% of the institutions right now. Business analytics is different than data collection: Data describes what is happening. If you have a lot of data, data is going to decide for you how to model what is going on and see new paths, which is where the analytics part comes in.  There is no question that future business analytics, i.e. innovations that increase value will be strongly rewarded. Dr. Bradley Erickson (Mayo Clinic)  discussed advanced image visualization and 3-D. The main innovation this past year is that "thin clients are starting to act fat", i.e. 3-D applications are starting to have more of the fat client functionality. In addition,  ipads, laptops are now able to run these applications and also now work on high latency networks and low bandwidth. There is more workflow support in the applications: simple mouse clicks will support going through the steps of the processing. Unfortunately, these tools still do not integrate well with RIS (Radiology Information System) : it is not known what studies are in process, reported, completed etc. There is more reporting capability within 3-D, especially in structured format such as  direct information about a stenosis to report. More and more of these applications run on mainstream hardware, it is not required to have specialized hardware processors anymore. Outsourcing as part of Teleradiology providers is becoming more popular as well. Dr. Keith Dryer (Mass General) gave a presentation about cloud computing. The question of the computing is whether it is on the ground or in the sky? We see applications moving from client based, to server based, and now cloud (internet based). The advantage of cloud computing is definitely to allow far better cross enterprise communication, while needing a lower capital investment and have immediate upgrades, automatic remote access. However, as he mentioned, the forecast is still partly cloudy which means that a lot of work needs to be done still. Dr. Anthony Seibert from UCDavis discussed DR changes. Many vendors now offer portable wireless detectors which allow for "POS" or Point Of Service imaging  for the OR (Operating Room), ER (Emergency Room) and bedsides. It is easy now to retrofit existing radiology rooms. Detectors are now providing capabilities and is going beyond static to provide fluoro, and digital tomosynthesis.  Another upcoming modality is CT cone beam acquisition. The trend is getting more images, increasingly complicated hanging protocols, and last but not least in many cases higher patient dose. The public is demanding information about the dose. An important development is the definition of standardized dose index for DR/CR: instead of the S number, EI, etc. ,AAPM is proposing a new standard, unified among different vendors. This will allow technologists better manage and control the exposures. In addition to the emphasis on CT and fluoro dose, there is also a major initiative for pediatric imaging: Image gently: to have kid-size exposure factors, and for adults: the Image wisely campaign. AN important development is the IHE REM profile (Radiation Exposure Monitoring) which defines how modalities can accurately report the dose to reporting systems using new DICOM objects. Dr. David Weiss discussed: multimedia reporting, in particular, how the operation can become "reporting centric". The reporting system should connect with the information system, combine information with CAD and RIS. Radiologists spend sometimes up to 50% of their time  on report and not where they should spend the time, i.e. the interpretation of images. Critical result reporting has to be fast, time efficient, and require a multilevel security and audit trail support. This needs multivendor cooperation and communication, which is still a major ... Read more

Primary Healthcare Conference In Oman, Special Report…

Healthcare service is one of the most continuously changing fields. New trends, procedures and applications are emerging every day, including combining other technologies with healthcare services for improved outcome, such as the role of information technology (IT) in enhancing healthcare services, and the use of sophisticated techniques in order to produce high quality images allowing further understanding of previously unclear mechanisms. In order to cope with these changes, Crown Plaza hotel, based in Sohar, Oman, hosted the primary health conference.  The conference was the 5th national conference and 8th Gulf Conference to be held; it was launched by the Health Minster in Oman, Dr. Ahmed bin Mohammed al Saeedi and took place for two days. The conference was organized by the directorate-General of Health Services in the Northern Batinah Region. It was carried out under the theme "Orienting primary healthcare to cope with the needs of patients and the community.” Several attendants from Oman, GCC countries and UK joined the conference. Discussions were mainly focusing on the recent challenges facing the enhancement of healthcare services, in addition to the strategies and policies carried out to involve society, individuals, government, and private sectors in order to build a partnership targeting the elevation of healthcare service levels. Moreover, the conference was aiming to meet the international approach to reform primary healthcare services according to environmental and social changes. In addition to extending and organizing the healthcare services delivered to the community, according to the requirements and expectations of its citizens. Ideas were shared between healthcare experts in the gulf area and worldwide, since the conference provided a perfect chance to share experience between the participated audiences. ... Read more

Med-e-Tel 2010 perspective: By Mohamed…

The Med-e-Tel 2010 conference highlighted presentations of successful business cases, research activities, and practical experiences from healthcare givers. Moreover, it had discussions about telemedicine opportunities and experiences on both local ... Read more

Health 2.0 Conference, from healthcare IT perspective: …

Health 2.0 Europe revealed the increasing attention of European countries in healthcare IT. The conference took place at the Cité Internationale Universitaire in Paris this April. The event had three major aspects to discuss, which were the online search and content, patient and provider communities, and the consumer self-management tools. Moreover, the conference highlighted the governmental role in spreading the ideas, reviewed during the event, to healthcare communities including hospitals, insurance companies and pharmaceuticals providers. The event had leading speakers from several countries in the continent, including France, Germany, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, Denmark, Sweden and the Netherlands. Further more, based on the importance of the event, several major healthcare companies offered sponsorship, such as Pfizer, LEEM, Orange, Akamai, RAPP, Bayer, UCB, and LEEM. Among the topics discussed at Heath 2.0, was the governmental review of national health information systems such as Electronic Medical Records (EMR) and Personal Health Records (PHR) and their contributions in improving the level of healthcare services delivered to citizens. Back to the three major aspects highlighted at the beginning of the conference; Search & Content, the role of search technology in relation with government programs that provide the main sources of healthcare information was discussed at length, with case studies and researches presented by major healthcare online portals such as MedWorm from UK, Health On the Net Foundation from Switzerland, Organized Wisdom from the United States and Webicina from Hungary. Moving to the second aspect, Patients and Online Communities, international phenomena of online patient communities and their stages of advance, along with their roles and effects on healthcare services in several countries were discussed. Among the contributing names are PagineMediche.it from Italy, ACOR from the United States, and iWantGreatCare from UK. Third and the final aspect, the self-management tools were discussed in Health 2.0. It is still a point of debate in the United States regarding tools that offer patients some sophisticated information about medications and treatments similar, if not more, than their physicians. Several speakers highlighted this issue including Isabelle Adenot from French National Order of Pharmacists France, Roy Schoenberg, American Well from the United States, and Sabine Donnai from Imperative Health UK. Finally, it is a fact that Health 2.0 was a great chance for healthcare members, even from outside the European continent, to exchange new ideas and shared experience aiming to cope with the accelerating rhythm of development in the healthcare ... Read more


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Minister of Health, Dr. Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz Al-Rabiah, Opened Saudi Medicare 2010 - The 13th International Healthcare, Hospital Supplies and Medical Equipment Show on April 12, 2010, at the Riyadh International Exhibition Center. Mohamed Al Hussaini, Deputy General Manager, Riyadh Exhibitions Company, said, "This opens up numerous business and investment opportunities for those involved in the medical devices and services, healthcare insurance, pharmaceutical, and healthcare education fields which Saudi Medicare 2010 will bring to the table for local, regional and international individuals and groups." The conference highlighted the Saudi pharmaceutical and medical device markets, challenges, trends and developments within the medical field, as well as assesses prospects within the Saudi consumer healthcare and pharmaceuticals sector. Among the professional healthcare providers who attended the conference, Royal Philips Electronics showcased many healthcare solutions specially designed to address the needs of patients and healthcare providers in the Middle East. Philips concentrated on four important areas that would help improving healthcare delivery for patients with cardiac diseases, timely triage discovery to treatment, minimally invasive interventions and connected healthcare solutions in the home for chronic heart patients. Moreover, there were specialists from Europe, North America, the Middle East, and other parts of the world who acted as speakers of the 4th Medical Devices Scientific Forum and the 1st Radiology Technologists Conference, aiming to improve medical facilities and restructure the management of 218 government hospitals into private enterprises. They discussed specializations like medical imaging, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy and radiation protection, medical devices technology, its management and the challenges facing those working on it. In conclusion, the Saudi government supports the development of more medical education facilities, and therefore, it announced that some of these will be available for private sector investment and will seek to create partnerships with leading educational institutions to build the country’s medical education ... Read more

MedHealth Cairo 2010 Report: By Abdallah…

{xtypo_dropcap}T{/xtypo_dropcap}he eighth annual congress of the Arab Hospitals Federation, MedHealth Cairo 2010, was held at Semiramis InterContinental Hotel on 10 and 11 March 2010.  The congress was held simultaneously with the Arab Health Ministers Council and under the patronage of HE Mr. Amr Moussa, secretary general of the League of Arab States.  The theme of this year’s congress was “The Arab Hospital 2015” and the congress drew experts from all over the Arab world to discuss issues such as hospital accreditation, healthcare quality management and improvement, health tourism, telemedicine, information technology applications in healthcare, and the environmental impact of healthcare institutions. Various Hospitals and Healthcare IT companies participated in the exhibition with colorful flyers, flex banners, print material and flags.  Most of the booths were reserved by major hospitals in the Arab world and about 1/3rd of the booths were occupied by Healthcare IT companies.  Among the healthcare IT solutions offered by the companies were mainly Electronic Medical Records, Hospital Information System, and other decision support solutions.  There were also few companies from the standpoint of quality in healthcare sector and some of the organizations who are building healthcare foundations in the Arab world. Among the solutions providers, the exhibition also witnessed telemedicine service offered by “Telemed Providers”, a company with offices in US and Middle East with full cycle of the value chain of telemedicine.  Most of the hospitals and visitors showed great interest in remote medical services like tele-consultation and second opinions and teleradiology services.  The Telemed Providers booth was the most busy booth in the exhibition throughout both days in terms of visitation and interest.Hamad Medical Corporation had a prominent place in the exhibition and their team showed good efforts and spirit in delivering the message of owners of the corporation. Among other hospitals were, AlShorouk Hospital, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Bangkok Hospital, Cairo Orthopedic Center, Clemenceau Medical Center, Dar Al Mona Medical Resort for Care and Rehab, Dar El Hekma Hospital, Private Hospital Association of Jordan, Royal Care International, Syndicate of Hospitals in Lebanon etc.Other than the Telemedicine services offered by Telemed Providers, The Healthcare IT companies who participated were CompuMedical, DMS, Health Insights, Tamer Company etc. The congress and exhibit was a prime chance for all stake-holders to discuss the future of healthcare in the Arab world.  The participants and visitors of MedHealth Cairo 2010 were impressed by the wide range of services offered, some of them for the first time in the region, such as the remote medical services and distance medicine solutions.   Thanks to the efforts of the Arab Hospitals Federation, the organizers, and participants, MedHealth Cairo 2010 turned out to be great success. {xtypo_quote_right}MedHealth Cairo 2010 Report: By ... Read more


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{xtypo_dropcap}T{/xtypo_dropcap}he European Congress of Radiology (ECR) still has a lot to show for radiology industry, not only regarding new modalities provided by vendors but also regarding new techniques for improving radiologists' quality. Among the companies attended the ECR is Varian Medical Systems. Varian highlighted its line of PaxScan X-ray image detectors for filmless imaging. Along with Varian's X-ray tubes for fluoroscopy, angiography, cardiology and cone-beam CT imaging. Varian's panel digital detector technology includes the most proven and widely used imaging technology. The panel aims to set new standards with its larger field of view and its capability to acquire high resolution images. Philips Healthcare is also one of the major companies showing its range of products at the ECR. Philips spotlighted its high-level product lines including award winning, Extended Brilliance Workspace, with Philips MRI solution Sonalleve MR-HIFU which helps in performing uterine fibroid ablation through a noninvasive approach. That is, in addition to Philips's IT solutions portfolio that aims to help in the improvement of EMR. There is increasing attention to the needs of radiology and diagnostic imaging industry even from companies outside Europe. For instance, Ziosoft, a company from Japan, announced at the ECR that both French and German translations will be included in its 3D, 4D and 5D analytics visualization software. This shows the commitments of companies such as Ziosoft to the European market needs and that this market is a promising one to attract more and more investments. ECR also had several other companies announcements about new contracts and agreements with European organizations for further cooperation. An example about such contract is the one presented by Carestream. Carestream Health presented a long-term agreement for digital imaging services with Stichting Samenwerkende Ziekenhuizen Oost Groningen (SSZOG), a collaboration foundation between three hospitals of east Groningen in the Netherlands. Upon this agreement, Carestream Health will provide its eHealth PACS Services to the three hospitals forming the SSZOG. Finally, ECR 2010 confirmed more cooperation and understanding between all members of the radiology and diagnostic imaging communities, starting with radiologists who had the chance to learn the new technology developed to aid them in their work, along with companies which presented their high leveled products to the attending audience. These companies also had more and more understanding for radiologists' needs which will surely help in developing new technologies. {xtypo_quote_right}ECR 2010 Coverage – Part-2: by ... Read more


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{xtypo_dropcap}T{/xtypo_dropcap}he ECR (European Congress of Radiology) is organized by The European Society of Radiology and is taking place in Vienna, Austria from 4-8 March. ECR 2010 spotlighted several important and interesting issues, including functional imaging in CT, biomarkers, MRI of the lungs, and hybrid imaging. In addition, several other topics were discussed such as the state of the multiple sclerosis, adrenals, and lymph node imaging. Courses on abdominal emergencies and on lung diseases plus a mini course on the liver took place. Moreover, ECR presented a foundation Course on radiology of head and neck. Finally, discussions on managing patients with cancer were carried out. Several high-ranked companies presented lines of products during the ECR, with attention to cover the increased demand by radiologists for new diagnostic imaging devices and technologies. Several new trends were discussed by modality vendors, for instance, Siemens presented its Acuson S2000 ultrasound system. This system aims to apply the use of ultrasound for detection of breast cancer in women. Although using ultrasound in that field was limited and considered secondary to mammography, this concept is to change shortly, thanks to Siemens new technologies. Speaking of mammography, AGFA healthcare presented its DX-M CR systems. The DX-M CR meets market requirements for diagnostic images with high quality. DX-M CR has covered another important aspect which is safety by its capability of exposure dose control and reduction. Agfa HealthCare system is the most complete CR system to date. The contributing companies at the ECR 2010 did not only cover technical aspects of radiology with its new modalities but it also presented several systems that improve the quality of radiologists by applying quality assurance systems to evaluate the work quality of radiologists. An example of such quality assurance systems is the one developed by NightHawk. Since NightHawk's system was already applied in the United States, it is the time for it to be used in Europe to improve the quality of radiologists there. In conclusion, it is surely that ECR 2010 aimed to improve all aspects of radiology and diagnostic imaging. Starting from providing new solutions and techniques for imaging until improving the qualities of radiologists by quality assurance programs. {xtypo_quote_right}ECR 2010 Coverage – Part-1 by ... Read more

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