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A new hormonal treatment would be an option in treating persistent prostate cancer

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According to a recent preliminary study, a new hormonal therapy would offer doctors a new solution forprostatetreatment of certain resistant type of prostate cancer that occur even after the surgical removal of testis. The study was highlighted online on The Lancet.

The study is composed of three stages; only two of them were needed to assess the new drug treatments. Yet, further studies are required before having federal approval for the new treatment. The hormone treatment is called MDV3100, it was evaluated as a treatment of a disease condition known as castration-resistant prostate cancer. Researchers said that prostate tumors are in need of testosterone in order to grow. The treatment usually includes castration, along with medications, aiming to deprive the cancer from testosterone. This treatment usually kills some cancer cells, yet, other cancer cells remain dormant. These cells would start to grow again and can even survive without having much testosterone, forming what is called castration-resistant prostate cancer.

During this study, Dr. Howard Scher, of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, and his team assessed the MDV3100 hormonal treatment against castration resistant prostate cancer in 140 men in the United States. The researchers administered varying doses, from 30 to 600 milligrams a day, to the men in order to determine the maximum tolerable dose, which was found to be 240 milligrams. The researchers said "We recorded encouraging anti-tumor activity with MDV3100 in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer," both before and after chemotherapy. The researchers have started the third stage of experiments, in which they are going to compare the hormone treatment to a placebo aiming to decide if it going to help men suffering from advanced prostate cancer to live longer.


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